HISTORY OF LAA DEVELOPS HISPANIC LEADERS

Alvaro H. Muñoz, Director of Alvaro Muñoz & Associates and professor at Herzing University, has been a longtime supporter of the Latin American Association. He sat down with me in a candid interview on his story of the 40 year legacy that the LAA has lived. As a Columbian born industrial engineering major with no English speaking ability, Alvaro found the Latin American Association in 1979 in hope of achieving his aspirations. As a recipient of the services offered by the LAA, Alvaro gained English knowledge and a new found determination for success. “I’m a business person. I started out as the best mail man there ever was and climbed my way to the top.” He was originally told he had no permission to work at SunTrust Bank, but the LAA called SunTrust to inform them that he did have the credentials necessary and advocated for his professionalism on their behalf. When he was promoted to a managerial position at SunTrust, he hired people out of LAA and eventually became the Treasurer in 1986 to give back. He then became the Vice-Chairman and later former Chairman of the Board in 1989 that lead to the shaping of the LAA’s future employment growth. After turning full swing 10 years later, Alvaro left the Latin American Association as a Hispanic Leader in the Atlanta Community and recognized as an International Business Success.

“The needs have been the same for the Latin American Association over the years. Employment, social services, and translations have been the core services that have help changed the lives of the Latino community in Georgia. “–Alvaro H. Muñoz

Funding from the United Way and Elena Zamos were key pieces in the shaping of the Latin American Association as an organization he also mentioned. The community of the LAA has evolved Hispanic business leaders with high positions in their respective industries through community relationship building. The awareness of political policies and satellite offices (outreach centers) has fundamentally changed people’s lives as the Hispanic population has exponentially increased in Georgia. With the help of the LAA, the Latino community has seen itself achieve dreams more than it has ever imagined and looks to another 40 more years of good fortune that continue to shape the Hispanic leaders of tomorrow.

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