SOCIAL MEDIA MEASUREMENT ANALYTICS

http://searchenginewatch.com/article/2249515/Social-Media-ROI-14-Formulas-to-Measure-Social-Media-Benefits#smroi-tactic-planning

 

Reuters Social Media Editor, Anthony De Rosa

Klout measures influence based on your ability to drive action on social networks, and has begun to incorporate real-world influence.  The Klout Score is a number from 1-100 that represents the aggregation of multiple pieces of data about your social network activity. We compute the Klout Score by applying our score model to these signals.  The Klout Score currently incorporates more than 400 signals from seven different networks. We process this data on a daily basis to generate updates to your Score.  +K received: Receiving +K increases you’re Klout Score by an amount that is capped in every 90-day measurement cycle to protect the integrity of the Score.

Wikipedia

  • Page Importance: Measured by applying a PageRank algorithm against the Wikipedia page graph.
  • Inlinks to Outlinks Ratio: Compares the number of inbound links to a page to the number of outbound links.
  • Number of Inlinks: Measures the total number of inbound links to a page.
  • The Klout Score now includes sources that indicate real-world influence, with Wikipedia as a new primary data source.

The majority of the signals used to calculate the Klout Score are derived from combinations of attributes, such as the ratio of reactions you generate compared to the amount of content you share.  We also consider factors such as how selective the people who interact with your content are. The more a person likes and retweets in a given day, the less each of those individual interactions contributes to another person’s score. Additionally, we value the engagement you drive from unique individuals.  It’s great to have lots of connections, but what really matters is how people engage with the content you create.  Adding more networks helps us more accurately measure your influence and can only increase your Score.

Influence is built over Time

In most instances, your influence should not radically change from one day to the next. The Klout Score is based on a rolling 90-day window, with recent activity being weighted more than older activity.  Retweets, Likes, comments and other interactions on the social Web are all signals of influence. However, just looking at the count of these actions does not tell the whole story of a person’s influence. It’s important to look at how much content a person creates compared to the amount of engagement they generate.

Klout Score for Twitter:

  • Retweets: Increase your influence by exposing your content to extended follower networks.
  • Mentions: People seeking your attention by mentioning you are a strong signal of influence. We also take into account the differences in types of mentions, including “via” and “cc”.
  • List Memberships: Being included on lists curated by other users demonstrates your areas of influence.
  • Followers: Follower count is one factor in your Score, but we heavily favor engagement over size of audience.
  • Replies: Replies show that you are consistently engaging your network with quality content.

LinkedIn Klout Score:

  • Title: Your reported title on LinkedIn is a signal of your real-world influence and is persistent.
  • Connections: Your connection graph helps validate your real-world influence.
  • Recommenders: The recommenders in your network add additional signals to the contribution LinkedIn makes to your Score.
  • Comments: As a reaction to content you shares, comments also reflect direct engagement by your network.

Google+ Klout Score:

Comments: As a reaction to content you shares, comments also reflect direct engagement by your network.

+1’s: The simplest action that shows engagement with the content you create.

Reshares: Reshares increase your influence by exposing your content to extended networks on Google+.

Instagram Measurement: Take a look at Statigram, IInstagram or Gramfeed.

Use Statigram to analyze your Instagram:

  1. Follow the steps above to sign in and receive your report.
  2. Go through each page of your report and make notes on your most successful content. Some things to pay attention to: Which photos and filters generate the most engagement? What time of day you get the most engagement? Which of your tags are in the top tags? How many followers are you gaining?
  3. Create a timeline for checking your stats periodically.
  4. Use your stats to create content that is targeted toward what your audience is drawn to.

Engage using Instagram on a Web Desktop: Using Instagram from your mobile device is the only way to get full-functionality, but engaging from the computer can be useful—especially if you’re already doing work on the computer—so you don’t have to switch to mobile during times when you’re not posting content.

Klout

While recuperating after having his jaw wired shut, Joe Fernandez had to rely on Twitter and Facebook to communicate. Unable to speak to anyone, he noticed how online communication influenced his personal network and set out to create a website that could measure word of mouth and how it scaled.

In the beginning of obessing over this idea, he was unable to buy the domain name for Klout.com as it was already owned by another business owner.  However, Joe Fernandez was a real entrepreneur that knew how to hustle.  When former owner of klout.com at one point tweeted that he was at a restaurant in San Francisco, Fernandez went there, threw an envelope with $5,000 in cash on the table and told him that he would stop bothering him if he finally agreed to sell the domain name.  He launched Klout in 2008 by quitting his job, sleeping on couches in Singapore with developers that believed in him, abandoning his friends, and risking his life’s savings.  It’s scores fluctuate based on the analysis of these networks:

Facebook

  • Mentions: A mention of your name in a post indicates an effort to engage with you directly.

  • Likes: The simplest action that shows engagement with the content you create.

  • Comments: Reaction to content you share and direct engagement by your network.

  • Subscribers: Subscriber count is a more persistent measure of influence that grows over time.

  • Wall Posts: Posts to your wall indicate both influence and engagement.

  • Friends: Friend count measures the reach of your network but is less important than how your network engages with your content.

Twitter

  • Retweets: Increase your influence by exposing your content to extended follower networks.

  • Mentions: People seeking your attention by mentioning you is a strong signal of influence. We also take into account the differences in types of mentions, including “via” and “cc.”

  • List Memberships: Inclusion on lists curated by others demonstrates your areas of influence.

  • Followers: Follower count is a factor, but score heavily favors engagement vs. size audience.

  • Replies: Replies show that you are consistently engaging your network with quality content.

Google+

  • Comments: Reaction to content you share and direct engagement by your network.

  • +1’s: The simplest action that shows engagement with the content you create.

  • Reshares: Increase your influence by exposing your content to extended networks on Google+.

LinkedIn

  • Your reported title on LinkedIn is a signal of your real-world influence and is persistent.

  • Connections: Your connection graph helps validate your real-world influence.

  • Recommenders: Add additional signals to the contribution LinkedIn makes to your Score.

  • Comments: Reaction to content you share and direct engagement by your network.

Instagram

  • Follower Count: The number of people who see your pictures helps you  influence.

  • Likes and Comments: Interaction with your photo is a clear sign of your ability to drive action.

Klout

  • +K received: Receiving +K increases your Klout Score by an amount that is capped in every 90-day measurement cycle to protect the integrity of the Score.

Foursquare

  • Tips Done: The number of suggestions you’ve left that have been completed indicate your ability to influence others on foursquare.

Wikipedia

  • Inlinks: Measures the total number of inbound links to a page.

  • Ratio of Inlinks to Outlinks: Compares the number of inbound links to a page to the number of outbound links.

  • Page Importance (as measured by PageRank): Measured by applying a PageRank algorithm against the Wikipedia page graph.

Klout has over 100 million people scored by Klout, over 2.7 Billion pieces of content and connections analyzed daily, 3,500 partners and developers, and over 8 billion API calls per month.  Brands depend on Klout being an objective measurement tool to signify who does, and who doesn’t, have social media influence.  Because many have tried to game the system by being more active on Twitter, for example, Klout made their changes in hopes of greater transparency and accurate measurement.  A few are already looking at deleting their accounts altogether. At this juncture, I would imagine that Klout would want to become the default authority on the subject – and therefore want to be all-encompassing for everyone that participates in social media.

At the end of the day, market economics will determine the success of Klout. Will brands feel that the new algorithm is better? Will those that they choose to be “influential” because of their Klout score “deliver” what they were looking for? For social media marketers, having a selection of various metrics to choose from in measuring social media influence help deliver a well-equipped toolbox. Just as brands will have to determine if they feel the new Klout algorithm is a step forward or not, we social media marketers will also need to determine which metrics we feel best justify “influence” or help us in our analysis of social media users.

Klout built on this idea to show anyone how he or she can influence the world and its future.  The idea is that word-of-mouth is scalable and that influencer identification is a big business.  Klout provides a simple way for marketers to “rent” a set of influencers/advocates to obtain hoped-for outcomes. Klout is basically an email list marketer and an after-thought score.

Klout is probably the best-known influence tool. Klout is moving from a generic influence score and starting to score on topics. Many social media marketers put too much focus on one’s Klout score for making important decisions. It may not tell enough of a story and individual’s specific influence capabilities to spawn brand action yet.

Klout measures influence based on your ability to drive action on social networks, including real-world influence.  The Klout Score is a number from 1-100 that represents the aggregation of multiple pieces of data about your social network activity and is computed by the score model to these signals.  The Klout Score currently incorporates more than 400 signals from seven different networks. The data is processed on a daily basis to generate updates to your Score.  +K received: Receiving +K increases you’re Klout Score by an amount that updated every 90-day measurement cycle to protect the integrity of the Score.

The majority of the signals used to calculate the Klout Score are derived from combinations of attributes, such as the ratio of reactions you generate compared to the amount of content you share.  Factors also include how selective the people who interact with your content are, the more a person likes and retweets in a given day, and the less each of those individual interactions contributes to another person’s score. Additionally, Klout values the engagement you drive from unique individuals.  It’s great to have lots of connections, but what really matters is how people engage with the content you create.  More networks help accurately measure your influence and can only increase your score.

Influence is built over Time; your influence should not radically change from one day to the next. The Klout Score is based on a rolling 90-day window, with recent activity being weighted more than older activity.  Retweets, likes, comments and other interactions on the social Web are all signals of influence. However, just looking at the count of these actions does not tell the whole story of a person’s influence. It’s important to look at how much content a person creates compared to the amount of engagement they generate.  Both PeerIndex and Klout rank users based on data that comes from their Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn accounts, although the two sites describe their rankings somewhat differently. Klout talks about overall “reach” and “amplification,” both of which are determined by looking at a user’s activity and how much impact it has on their social graph.  PeerIndex says that it looks at a user’s activity in Twitter, Facebook, Quora, and LinkedIn and then comes up with an authority rank for their expertise in eight topic areas, which it uses to create an influence “footprint” topic for each user.

2) Kred

Kred is an emerging influence platform that is grounded in technical innovation from PeopleBrowser. They provide an influence index much like Klout, but they also produce an Outreach score. So not only is it important to score influence from a reach and subject matter expert perspective, but it is also valuable to understand a scoring for the degree of outbound engagement the individual performs. Kred also has “community” or topical social scoring. One of Kred’s differentiators is that they are transparent with regards to their scoring attributes. They literally show you how points are accumulated.  Every person or account on Twitter has a Kred score, which is made up of two parts: the influence score and the outreach score. Your influence score is a measure of your ability to inspire others as a number on a scale from 1 to 1,000, and is based on how often your tweets are retweeted, how many new followers you are gaining, and how many replies you generate. (Kred also looks at Facebook likes and Google +1s, but Twitter is the main source of data). It is very much like your Klout score. The Outreach score is measured in levels and is a reflection of how generous you are with retweeting and replying to others.

Kred also figures out which of 200 communities you belong to based on the information in your Twitter bio.  It can show you the influence of your whole community and how you rank in that community. “Everyone is an influencer somewhere where Kred can show you where you have influence.” Brand managers can define their own communities, which they will then be able to track.

The main difference from Klout is its transparency. It shows you exactly how you got your score and lets you drill down to every retweet to see how many points it was worth. A normal retweet might be worth 10 points, but one from somebody with high Kred might be worth 50. A mention is worth more than follow, and so on. Since Kred is calculating everyone’s scores in real-time, it normalizes your score against the average.  Kred also lets you incorporate your real-world accomplishments like degrees, honors, awards, and certificates. You will be able to send Kred a PDF proving an offline achievement, and they will add it to your Kred.

3) Peer Index

Allows you to be able to tell who is the opinion leader in a particular niche. The more communication with opinion leaders, the more a very targeted effect on your own authority you can have within your niche. While there are other more “overall” influence scores, Peer Index delves down more into industry specific authorities.  Focuses on tracking the top people on a specific topic, not just anyone.  Unlike Klout, PeerIndex also ranks what it calls “realness,” which is a measure of the likelihood that a user is an actual person rather than an automated feed or “spambot.” If a user has a huge number of followers but many of those are bots, that actually decreases their overall ranking.

Your overall PeerIndex score is a relative measure of your online authority: impact of your online activities and the extent to which you have built up a social, reputational capital on the web. Merely being popular doesn’t indicate authority. Authority is built up like a fingerprint on a category-by-category level using eight benchmark topics.  Someone cannot be authority without a receptive audience that listens and is receptive. To capture this, PeerIndex Rank includes audience score calculated for each profile.  Finally, the activity score accounts for someone who is active that has a greater share of attention of people interested in the topics they are interested in.

Benchmark Authority score is the measure of trust; how much can you rely on that person’s recommendations and opinion on a given topic; used to generate the overall authority score as well as produce the PeerIndex Footprint diagram.  The authority is a relative positioning against everyone else in each benchmark topic. The rank is a normalized measure against all the other authorities in the topic area.

Related to benchmark authority is topic resonance. This is a measure how your actions within a topic interest community resonant with the community.  It is only calculated resonance for topics that have been found to have a large enough community will produce a reasonable result. Although, you will only see the top five topics on the profile pages, we calculate for all topics we’ve detected you in.

Audience Score is indication of your reach generated from the number of people who listen and are receptive to what you are saying.  Being followed by large number of spam accounts, bots, and inactive accounts will reduce your audience score. The audience takes into account the relative size of your audience to the size of the audiences for the rest of community.

Activity Score is the measure of how much you do that is related to the topic area. Being to active and people will stop listening to you and if you are too inactive people will never know to listen to you.  It is done relative to the community. If you are part of a community that has lots of activity your level of activity will need to be higher to achieve the same relative score as in a topic that has a lot less.

Realness score is a metric that indicates the likelihood that the profile is of a real person, rather than a spambot or twitter feed. A score above 50 means we think this account is of a real person, a score below 50 means it is less likely to be a real person. A range of information is used to generate realness such as whether the profile is claimed and been linked to Facebook or LinkedIn with calculations modified by the realness the metric.  Claiming your profile will boost your authority, audience and activity scores and consequently your PeerIndex as well.

Before PeerIndex scores gets back to you, they are normalized. Every number in PeerIndex is based on a scale of 1 to 100, showing relative positions. The calculation helps you discriminate between top authorities to easily understand who the top authorities are. The trade-off is that many of us end up with seemingly lower scores.

Here’s an example: If you’re in the top 20% by authority in a topic like music, this means you have higher authority than 80% of others measured within music. Your normalized authority score for music will be 55 to 65. Remember a score of 60 puts you higher than 80% of people tracked in that topic. A score of 65, means you rank higher than 95% of the people tracked.


Topical Influencer

Topical Influencer is the next phase to grouping influencers under umbrellas as the natural next evolution of influencer marketing.  What does all this mean for identification, grouping companies, and certain people that are more relevant than others?  Topical Influencer Platforms are structured by topics across Twitter, blogs, Facebook, YouTube and other platforms with details on thousands of identified influencers.  These platforms are designed to help agencies and brands find social media influencers for nearly any given topic, from cloud computing to travel to motherhood.  It includes tools to filter, sort, target, monitor and engage relevant influencers with campaign ROI measurement.  Target the most relevant influencers refined by keywords, location, mentions, platform and other filters. Top influencers may be defined as either those with the greatest reach or the often times more approachable middle tier.  Your reduction of the time it takes to identify campaign-relevant influencers will be lessened by using these platforms.  Advertising, marketing and public relations agencies, as well as brands can execute highly targeted campaigns in social media and/or want in order to better understand their influential customers and prospects.

  • Platforms are organized as list Topics pre-filled with tens of thousands of influencers

  • Custom topical influence scoring based on peers, topicality and ability to drive action

  • Influencer profile citing their influential topics, social media accounts with reach and engagement, most shared content and other metrics

  • Custom target lists may be saved and recalled

Emphasize topical influencer holes of actionability:

However, there is a lack of actionability.  A lot of the metics provide ways to organize your lists and to monitor conversations, but they don’t engage with this market research data.  Brands need to drive topics around their culture, news, and happenings to create brand advocates.  Actionability on topical influencers gives marketers the ability to reach out with relevant information that drives actions in return from influencers.  Brands want brand advocates to create a social word of mouth program.

Traackr

Belief in relevance drives influence. This service is all about helping you find the relevant conversations so that you can get in on them and become an expert. TRAACKR offers a comprehensive set of features to find relevant influencers, manage engagement, and measure results.

SocMetrics

Focused on specific topical focus with pre-curated lists of 100+ categories — so you don’t have to start with a broad, keyword search that tends to push back a lot of junk data. Instead, major categories have been culled for accuracy and many broad topics (social media, automotive, moms, etc.) have already been cleaned to ensure the data is good.  Socmetrics takes into account multiple channels and reach including YouTube, Twitter, blog readership and the like.  Socmetrics’s algorithm credits a bit more stickiness to influence than tools like mBlast do.  While public relations professionals certainly want to reach influencers who are most influential now, there’s an argument that even someone who hasn’t taking to writing about a certain topic in a few weeks is still an influential person to that audience.

Three primary factors in determining its rankings:

  • Peer Validation – Does this person interact with other influencers in the topic and do their peers follow them, retweeted, etc.

  • Topicality – Is their content on-topic or close to it consistently versus diffused and scattered around other subjects. Are their followers interested in the topic in question, too? This would account for an influencer who blogs strictly about one topic versus someone who mixes personal and other topics in that might attract an audience perhaps not as interested in the core topic.

  • Ability to Drive Action – Does this person get shared? Is their engagement rate relative to each platform?  Does their audience respond with comments, shares, likes, votes, etc.

While each are interesting data points in an overall influencer identification program, there will always be debate as to which is most important or if other factors belong. With that said, each service out there — Traackr, Klout, mBlast, etc. — is just one way of looking at the data.

None are necessarily better than another and all are valid points of consideration. But it won’t ever be the only way to organize or find influencers.  You can save multiple lists as well, though your 25 person tracking limitation will kick in at some point. When you find an influencer in your searching, a hand “Add to List” button is there to easily sort and track the individuals in question. The system pulls in their latest content, Compete.com data on web traffic and more. There’s a lightweight CRM system on top of the tool as well, so you can keep notes about outreach or preferences in each influencer’s profile.

Also included is monitoring and ROI reporting. With your lists of influencers, the system will monitor and index all of their content and flag any that mentions your product or brand. So PR firms doing blogger outreach to a targeted list can produce a report that says, “Reached out to 25 influencers and landed placement with 22 of them.” Plus, with the monitoring function, you can easily see what they’re talking about now.

Appinions

A query based influence tool that lets you know how to understand whom the influencers are of any area by forming a specific query to do so. Appinions does contextual scoring versus individual scoring. Contextual scoring measures the degree of action taken by others (quote you/blog about you, link to you, retweet you) based on what you say.  Appinions can identify the individuals who have true influence on any subject, and provide a roadmap for clients on how to reach and influence those influencers to the client’s benefit.  Whether it’s Advertising or Public Relations campaigns on anything from branding issues to the potential effectiveness of an election, Appinions offers the most comprehensive, big-data, cross-channel approach to accomplishing those goals by identifying and reaching those who change opinions fastest.  Monitors activity on social networks, traditional print, and broadcast media.  For the first time, by monitoring before and after activity, they can get a real picture of just how their efforts have changed opinions and have influenced those who speak the loudest on any subject through a report card on the impact of Marketing.

Social Chorus

SocialChorus is the leading social word-of-mouth marketing solution for the brands that people love. SocialChorus enables customers to acquire and engage brand influencers, who deliver the most valuable social actions, with the greatest quantity, across all social channels. Brands can consistently deliver more of the most valuable social actions through trusted social influencers.  SocialChorus has launched over 200 social word-of-mouth programs for the largest brands in the world and deliver measurable social ROI at three to five times on average in a few weeks

Maven social

A maven is a trusted expert in a particular field, who seeks to pass knowledge on to others.  The person who understands a topic has accumulated knowledge.  A social media maven is an individual who identifies interesting or trending content and shares it with a large online network. The term social media maven is sometimes applied to people who are adept at using social media for commercial purposes, such as spreading a particular message about a product or service. As with mavens in other areas, social media mavens are seen as being more advanced in their understanding of social media than the average population.  The idea of a social media maven is a bit controversial in that many people believe that there are actually many mini-mavens within groups of friends. These mini-mavens play that role for their immediate network, giving opinions, dispensing advice, selecting the news of worth, and highlighting products and services. Social media mavens in a truer sense use their savvy to collect vast armies of followers, making them very valuable from a business perspective.

The MavenSocial Platform enables users to Create, Manage, Measure and Store Customer data.

MavenSocial will  leverage existing marketing assets on Social Networks and amplify your results while tracking your social media influencers from one location. Know where the first share came from, and the influence it had on brand dissemination across multiple channels. MavenSocial is is the leading company with analytics which prove and explode every marketing dollar and provide data on customer profiles unlike any other social platform.

Identification space

Influencer Relationship Management (“IRM”) measurement is directly analogous to CRM.  Marketers setting up a new target list for an upcoming campaign want to pull a list of top influencers within a specific category and rank them not only by these generic scores but also by variables that are proprietary to the relationship with these influencers.  SocialSteve, defined influence from a marketer’s point of view.  We need brand-specific, proprietary scores based upon influencer action and outcomes — the next generation of influencer scores.

Put in another way: beyond “contextual scoring” and “individual scoring” marketers need “performance scoring”  – which is only possible in a closed-loop IRM platform where the brand owns the relationship with the influencers.  Blowing up left with listening and lists, plus targeted Google search, as well as more refined recent entries into the arena such as SocMetrics, Traackr, GroupHigh help.

Influencer Advocates

  • Traditional influencers = Professional

  • Top of pyramid: WSJ, NYT, Bieber, etc.

  • Emerging (digital) influencers = Power Middle

  • From mommy bloggers to niche interest Twitter publishers.

  • Influencers by connection = Advocates

  • The cream of the crop recruited from Facebook and Twitter communities, consumers, brand email lists, employees, and customers.

What to do?  First, define your business, marketing strategy, and KPI’s.  You need to ACTIVATE by good old fashion marketing & PR:. messaging, content, co-creation of value, offers, calls to action; all the components of brand to influencer/advocate collaboration. Manage the value exchange.  You then need to rank and filter.  Klout, Kred, PeerIndex, SocMetrics, Traackr – they all give us ranking metrics that are useful in varying ways. The big next step here is to provide marketers with the ability to include performance data into the ranking algorithms. (Analytics attached to accessibility is a big step in this direction) This doesn’t negate the generic scores; it adds an additional score to the brand marketer’s toolkit that correlates to relevant outcomes.

Finally MANAGE the influencer data:  store the influencer data in a UI that enables marketers, enrich that data over time, keep the influencer relationship warm through the use of drip marketing, track what they are doing for your brand across all channels as well as what the brand is doing for the influencers (combine offline & online data & communications).  This is where comes in to play, and where the PR firms need most help.  In fact, all brands need to manage growing amount of earned and social influencer data.

 

Conclusion: Influencer Marketing Programs to create Brand Advocates (Pages 11-14)

In conclusion, you want advocacy programs for your influencers marketing program.  You want to know how to use influencer marketing to create brand advocates, brand evangelists, brand ambassadors, questions, how to drive to action, how to write a blog, how to get to a share, how to get a tweet, and drive impressions.  Using influencer identification for these people should create your Digital street team.  There are a handful of key points you should consider:

1)    From a marketer’s perspective, not everyone is equal. Those that have a strong reach and following AND can drive brand action deserve greater attention and tender, loving care from brand marketers as opposed to the general public.

2)    There are different types of influencers that you want to engage with and build strong relationships with.

3)    A platform or tool should not determine how you go about influence marketing. You should determine whom you want to reach, how you plan to engage and go about building a relationship, and then determine the platform(s) to help you get there.


Influence marketing programs move your target influencers through the influencer marketing process to create levels of long-term engagement thru multiple touchpoints built over months andyears.  The goal of these programs are to build loyalty among influencers and term them into brand champions.  You have to create a relationship with an influencer by building awareness, building credibility, creating an emotional connection, creating loyalty, and then turning them into a brand advocate.  Because influencers have the ability to do drive action, converting influencers to advocates for your brand can be a powerful way to amplify awareness and support your brand initiatives.

The four steps are:

1) Identify your Influencers: Consider influencers you’ve already engaged with and find new influencers

  • New Influencers lead geneartion: Identify the topics witin which you’re looking to engage influencers with based upon your brand on prominent feeds it focuses on , brand reputation, brand attributes, characteristics of your target audcience, or industry topics related to your product or service.  Use monitoring tools to search conversations, news articles, and blog posts across the web and pay attention to sentiment around the topic.

  • Consider known influencers: Your PR, marketing, and corporate communications teams have already engaged.  Cluser them and move them together.  Consider influences you may already be following by looking at blog authors from your RSS feader, people your following on twitter, and newsmakers in traditional media.

  • Anaylzye your influencer list: Evaluate each individual for credibility, engagement, and activity.  Understand the point of view of each influencer you identify relative to your brand.  Look to see if their blog posts or articles get comments, and wheter they’re active in responding to those comments.  Do they a have a scoial meida presence and are they active?  What channels are they most active on and if they engage in conversations with their followers.  Establish easiest way to contact.

2) Map your Influencers through the process

 

Influence Clusters are highly focused groups of topical influencers aligned to a particular niche, goal, or objective.  When creating influence clusters, assign influencers in the same topical area, who are at the same phase of the influence marketing program.  

3) Determine which Brand Assets you possess or want to create

Brand Assets are tools you can use to help engage with influencers.  These include, White papers, primary research, meet R & D, Meetup, Tradeshow, Expert Voice, Online Event, Brand Party, Give Products, VIP Treatment, Invite to Speak at Event, Content Contributor, and Demo.

 

4) Create your program

Determine how you wish to engage them to move through your influence marketing program.

SOCIAL MEDIA CONVERSATION DIAGRAM: http://mashable.com/2013/07/01/conversation-prism-brian-solis/

Post should have a variety of industry news, photo, stories, and client news.  Promote your events on Facebook.  You should be collaborative and listen.

“Listening more than talking.”

Ifthisthenthat.com

How does picture/video react to posts?

Photos capture attention, testing; Don’t have to be professional photos.

Pinterest is an electronic bulletin board that you can use visually.  Websites need to have pinnable content.

You should care about Vine because Twitter acquired them and it now has over 4 million users as well as is the number one downloaded app in the App store.  Michael McDonald bathtub vine.

Make your blog social too, by embedding posts and engaging with your audience.

How should a company create a social media strategy?

  • Your Audience
  • Timely
  • Target all customers
  • Topical
  • Use short posts and pictures
  • Reach out to other circles
  • Be Proactive

How do you build a base: Photo Contest (Instagram, Flickr).  Zappos uses a creative contest by having a fan photo Friday and including the person’s name that posted the picture.

Use Instagram, acquired by Facebook, and “let the photo speak.”  Not everyone has a good visual story.  You can get more photos by having your fan base create user-generated content.  When you get back customer complaints, sometimes it is best to take it offline with a phone call or an email.  Act like a human.  The way you would treat somebody offline should be no different than the customer service you should give them online.

@DeltaAssist

Use a unique call tracking phone number for your videos and have google goals, can also track through bitly

Social media is heavily related to PR.  Brands interacting/Google Alerts (Vocus)

Partner with Journalists/reporters

Measure your social ROK with Google Analytics, Social Media is a part of your marketing plan.

#Hashtags on facebook?  Most would say no, but only use them if they are relevant for an event or contest.

Favorite brands: Skittles, Coca-Cola, Delta, Braves, Zoo (Google+)

Twitter may be lagging behind visually, but let’s not forget about the national events that have been reported on Twitter first.  More reliable sources in real-time make this network far away from going dead.

Each platform has a different user experience.  Infographics are on the rise with relevancy and popularity.  “HOW TO WIN AT ROCK, PAPER, SCISSORS, EVERYTIME”

How do you determine which platform to use?  Where your audience is.

Due-follow link

No-follow links

Facebook still seems to be the most engaging.  Try putting a Youtube video in your email signature.

  1. From your Admin Panel, click on See All in the Insights section.  Facebook takes you to the Overview tab.
  2. From the All Posts tab, sort your posts by Reach & Engagement.  Note which post types received the highest numbers:  status updates, links, photos, or video?  What was the content of the post?  Sort again to see which posts received the lowest number.  Make a note of your successes and be sure to repeat those and even improve on them.
  3. Identify when when your fans are online:  make sure to post on those days & times (Posts> When Your Fans Are Online).
  4. Find out who your fans are demographically.  Note their gender, age range, and location.
  5. Figure out which demographic group engages most with your posts (People>People Engaged).
  6. Identify the areas of your business page that people are most interested in (Pages>Page Visits.  For most people it’s the Timeline, then the About page.  Which are your top 3 sources?

Create a spreadsheet that will track your Facebook statistics for each month.  I recommend tracking your Top 5 posts (by type & content), Reach demographics, and Time Zones.  That will help you reach the most fans on a consistent basis and get the most out of your business page.  Write for SmartBlog on Social Media, one of the largest and most-well respected blogs in our industry.

Foursquare Klout-Tips Done: The numbers of suggestions you’ve left that have been completed indicate your ability to influence others on foursquare.

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